5 Things I Wish I’d Known When Choosing a High-Risk OB-GYN

I forgot my post about choosing a high-risk ob-gyn appeared on Preemie Babies 101 today…until I saw a belly in my Facebook newsfeed. I thought, “Hey, that kind of looks like my belly.” And then I realized it was.

Blogging about pregnancy and childbirth sure can be awkward sometimes.

Click here if you’re interested. In high-risk ob-gyns, not my belly in front of a Christmas tree. There I go feeling awkward again.

Seeking a Second Opinion or Finding a New Doctor

Heart Problems

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On Friday, I was over at Preemie Babies 101 with a blog post about second opinions. Here’s an excerpt:

You know that feeling when you’ve just left the NICU after a long day, your cell phone rings, and you recognize that the number is the NICU?

My husband and I had just returned home from the hospital. I knew my son was scheduled for a follow-up cardiology exam because of a heart murmur, but since so many preemies havePDAs, I really wasn’t concerned.

The NICU nurse on the other end of the line told me that the cardiologist wanted to speak with me, and before I knew what had happened, I had a diagnosis. And it wasn’t a PDA. I had no idea if it was life-threatening or what J’s prognosis was. I was shell-shocked and nearly speechless. As I stumbled through my questions, I realized quickly that I was getting nowhere because the pediatric cardiologist had no interest in speaking with me. So, I asked her if she was writing a report to go in J’s records. Her answer?

“Yes, I’ll write a report, but you won’t understand it.”

The rest of the blog post is available at Preemie Babies 101.

12 Tips For Getting Synagis Injections Approved

My most recent article on Preemie Babies 101 posted yesterday. Here’s an excerpt:

©tiverylucky/freedigitalphotos.net

©tiverylucky/freedigitalphotos.net

Getting Synagis injections approved by insurance companies can be cumbersome, but for me the threat of my babies catching RSV was always worse. So, I stumbled my way through several Synagis approval scenarios. Hopefully, these tips can make your Synagis quest a little easier.

But first, it’s important to understand that there are general guidelines that exist to determine who gets Synagis injections. In the past, babies with a history of prematurity, lung or heart conditions, or extensive hospitalizations who were less than 6 months of age at the beginning of RSV season have been covered. Preemies born at 28 weeks or earlier who were less than one year old often qualified. Preemies or other babies with significant health concerns who were in high-risk situations, such as full-time daycare, exposure to other young children, or being a multiple, sometimes received Synagis injections up to age 2. At the time of this writing, changes to the guidelines are being discussed, so follow up with your pediatrician about whether your child qualifies.

  • Your pediatrician should be supportive of your quest to get Synagis. At a minimum, he or she should be willing to discuss Synagis as an option and why your child may or may not qualify. You are fighting an uphill battle if you have to fight your pediatrician in addition to the insurance company. If your doctor is unfamiliar with Synagis, that person might not be the best fit for a preemie who needs many special considerations in the first years.

Please click here to read more.